In my early 20s, I had everything you were supposed to have to be “happy”: an affluent upbringing, devoted parents, school accolades, all the trophies, admission to an Ivy League school. But internally, I was desperately treading water in an ever-rising sea of already high expectations. All I felt was “not enough.” I was not enough. And I was drowning.

Therapy didn’t get me unstuck. It helped me understand why I was miserable, but instead of changing anything, I stayed married to that story: my mother, my childhood, feeling pressured to be perfect, yadda yadda. Understanding without changing, I was rolling around in the muck instead of cleaning it up. As a tool for change, “why” fell short.

Then, I got a coach (a year after calling and hanging up on her when I wasn’t ready). The coach helped me unlearn my self-destructive habits and replace them with positive ones. We worked on my mind and my emotions, but, most importantly, took action in a way I hadn’t done in therapy. She helped pull me out of the rough water and find my footing on terra firma.

My life changed radically within a year.

The concept that life could be lived in a joyful, healthy, and internally driven way was fascinating new terrain for me. If I could make behavioral changes that seemed impossible to me and radically change my relationship with myself, what else could I do? What could I help other people do? I wanted to pour my academic curiosity into the science of well-being, behavioral change, and optimal human functioning. I did—and made it my career.

Since then, I have studied under and taught alongside some of the most influential and innovative psychologists in the field of Positive Psychology, including: Martin Seligman, Ph.D., Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Ph.D., Angela Duckworth, Ph.D., Barry Schwartz, Ph.D., Jonathan Haidt, Ph.D., and Barbara Fredrickson, Ph.D. Not only did they pioneer the psychological study of happiness, but made terms like “flow” and “grit” a part of our colloquial vocabulary. My research at Columbia with Dr. Suniya Luthar focused on the developmental outcomes of both affluent and low-income adolescents.

But the biggest take away from a life steeped in academia:

Education is good. Application is better.
Transformation is best.

Bachelor of Arts

Masters in Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP)

PhD in Developmental Psychology

Certified Life Coach

Harvard University

University of Pennsylvania

Columbia University

The Life Coach School

Bachelor of Arts

Harvard University

Masters in Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP)

University of Pennsylvania

PhD in Developmental Psychology

Columbia University

Certified Life Coach

The Life Coach School

@ 2018 Dr. Sasha Heinz, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
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